Measurement Library

American Gas Association Publications (2002)

The Atlantic LNG Project, Point Fortin, Trinidad
Author(s): Alan D. Hatfield
Abstract/Introduction:
On the small Caribbean island nation of Trinidad and Tobago near the east coast of Venezuela the Atlantic LNG Company of Trinidad and Tobago has now completed 3 years of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) production and exports from a single process train. The first LNG ship was loaded in April 1999 and approximately 190 cargoes of LNG have been shipped to US and Spanish markets since that time. This represents an estimated equivalent of 500 BCF of natural gas shipped during this period. Atlantic LNG Company is now expanding with two additional process trains and a third LNG storage tank, constructed at the same site in Point Fortin, Trinidad. The contractor for Train 1, Bechtel International is also the prime contractor for Trains 2 & 3. Chicago Bridge and Iron is constructing the 3rd LNG tank. The liquefaction process for all three trains is an updated version of the original Phillips Petroleum Company cascade process, used in their baseload LNG plant located in Kenai, Alaska.
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Document ID: F6CFA136

Proper Electrofusion Methods
Author(s): Parashar Perry Sheth
Abstract/Introduction:
The electrofusion method of joining plastic pipes and fittings are now extensively utilized due to its compatibility of joining dissimilar PE materials. The perception among the operators about the electrofusion process is that it is fool proof, however various installation errors can cause premature in-service fusion failure. This paper provides the importance of various precautions required during the installation of electrofusion fittings. This includes the significance of:
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Document ID: DE0D6C64

Preparing An Integrity Management Plan
Author(s): David Berger
Abstract/Introduction:
Under the soon to be proposed gas integrity management program from the DOTs Office of Pipeline Safety (OPS), all operators of federally defined gas transmission lines will have to implement and develop an Integrity Management Plan (IMP) for these pipelines. This paper will discuss some of the steps that can be taken to develop such plans in an organized and effective manner. It will also discuss some of the techniques and tools that can be used. An AGA Technical Paper Pipeline Integrity, gives an outline of the methods and tools that can be used. Soon to be issued consensus standards from ASME, NACE and GPTC will also give guidance on integrity management plans and inspection procedures.
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Document ID: 9E824023

Quality Assurance: Ensuring Superior Service
Author(s): David Gerley
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: 2758F57D

A Correlative Sensor For Analysis Of Calorific Value And Gas Composition
Author(s): Daniel W. Peace
Abstract/Introduction:
Recognizing the need for an economical means to rapidly indicate and accurately track quality level changes in natural gas, Advantica Technologies (formerly BG Technology) of the UK, developed an energy-sensing device based on the correlative measurement principle. Correlative operation differs from other methods, such as calorimeters that burn the gas and chromatographs that separate and identify the gas components, in that physical measurements, (i.e., temperature, pressure, speed of sound, etc.), are used to determine gas quality parameters through empirical and mathematical relationships. Advantica Technologies employed in-depth knowledge of natural gases throughout the UK national transportation system, state-of-the-art modeling software, and the novel application of sensors to correlate an array of gas quality values from a minimum number of physical measurements. Prototype devices performed beyond expectations in both laboratory and field tests across the range of quality variations that occur in the UK gas composition.
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Document ID: F86F4521

Formation Of The North American Energy Standards Board
Author(s): Charles L. Driggs
Abstract/Introduction:
Anyone working in the control room or gas purchasing operations of a gas utility has heard of the Gas Industry Standards Board (GISB). GISB has been in operation since 1994, and the influence of GISB has altered the Gas Day, changed the procedures for shipping gas by pipeline, changed number of and timing of nomination and confirmation periods per day several times, changed the methods of obtaining information about pipeline shipments, and had a few other impacts in the gas distribution business. Not everyone realizes that GISBs standards are actually voluntary, but if adopted by FERC, these standards become the required method of doing things involving gas shipments in the wholesale market by interstate pipelines. On January 1, 2002, GISB became NAESB, the North American Energy Standards Board. In todays discussion, Ill briefly explain why, what led to this, what this means for NAESB, and what impact this has on gas utility operations in the near term.
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Document ID: 378BE805

Filtration And Freeze Protection For Natural Gas Measurement Operations And Instrumentation
Author(s): David J. Fish
Abstract/Introduction:
Consistent and continuous pipeline operations are key and critical factors in todays natural gas pipeline industry. The competitive nature of the business, together with the strict rules and regulations of natural gas supply, mandate that companies stay on top of all operational parameters that could cause interruption or complete shut-down of the natural gas supply to customers. Identifying what may ultimately cause problems is a first step to controlling and eliminating those problems for the supplier. The natural phenomenon of freezing is a common occurrence in the operation of a natural gas pipeline system. Freezing is a potential serious problem starting at the production well head through the last point in the customer delivery system. The occurrence of freezing is continuously reduced each step of the way, but care must be taken at each and every step to assure smooth operational conditions and satisfied consumers at the end of the line.
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Document ID: 61E3B4E8

Uncertainty Analysis Of An Ultrasonic Meter Calibration Process
Author(s): Thomas Kegel
Abstract/Introduction:
In March of 1999 CEESI completed construction of a natural gas flow calibration facility located in Clear Lake, Iowa. The uncertainty associated with the process of calibrating a meter in that facility has recently been estimated to be 0.23% at a 95% level of confidence. This paper describes the two part analysis leading to that value. The first part is based on manufacturers specifications while the second part is based on results from a Measurement Assurance Program.
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Document ID: F33E6309

Panel Discussion AGA Operations Conference Computer Aided Dispatch
Author(s): John D. Taggart
Abstract/Introduction:
Columbia Gas of Ohio implemented MDT Technology in our Columbus Market in January 1998. Approximately 100 MDT users where given two days of training and the dispatchers were trained for one day before the system was activated in their area. The only change that was made to operations at this time was no paperwork and job-site reporting. Dispatching for the Columbus Market was already centralized.
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Document ID: 8C7ED15D

Ultrasonic Noise Acoustic Filters
Author(s): James E. Gallagher, Michael P. Saunders
Abstract/Introduction:
The increasing use of Multi-path ultrasonic meters for natural gas applications has lead the gas measurement industry towards the challenge of resolving numerous installation hurdles. The installation challenges in question are not only piping induced disturbances that are not unique to MUSM applications but also noise induced disturbances such as those presented by Valves or Regulators. This paper will discuss the design, development and application of a new product concept of Acoustic Filter.
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Document ID: 97C4E6B1

Operational Effects That Influence Orifice Meter Accuracy
Author(s): Darin L. George, Thomas B. Morrow
Abstract/Introduction:
This paper presents a review of operational problems associated with orifice meters, and the influences of these problems on measurement bias. Many sources of error identified and reported in earlier publications are reviewed, and these historical data are combined with recent data collected at the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) Metering Research Facility (MRF). Examples include orifice plate geometries not specifically addressed by industry standards, characteristics of meter tubes, off-normal flow conditions and errors associated with differential pressure measurements. The paper presents quantitative information that can be used to reduce the costs associated with measurement bias and error in orifice meters.
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Document ID: 3353B835

Gas Sampling - Quality In Procedures Provides Accuracy In Results
Author(s): David J. Fish
Abstract/Introduction:
Interest levels with effective and accurate gas sampling techniques are currently at a very high priority within the natural gas industry. With the fluctuating ranges in natural gas prices, exploration interests, profitability, deregulation and consolidation of the work force, recoverable revenue must be accounted for. At large volume delivery points, a 3-5 BTU error in energy determination can cost companies tens of thousands of dollars within a very short time period. Accurate sampling techniques must be implemented with equal interest as is given to accurate volume measurement. MMBTU is the total of volume and energy. Sampling is the energy determination delivery system for this equation. Proper knowledge and correct implementation of the primary methods of sampling will provide a quality minded sampling program for the measurement personnel in natural gas companies.
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Document ID: B80A03A9

Scada Encryption In Practice
Author(s): George A. Shaw
Abstract/Introduction:
SCADA systems that utilize radio, PSTN, leased circuits, and similar means to transport data between secure sites may be vulnerable to cyber attack. Encryption, together with other cryptographic techniques, can reduce this risk. Incorporating secure data communications in new system designs can only be considered a long-term solution. Adding encryption to existing SCADA systems can be done, but the difficulty and costs of doing so will depend on several SCADA system specific factors as well as the design of the cryptographic system chosen for retrofit.
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Document ID: 33A77144

Well Bore Remediation Using Sonication
Author(s): James R. Ammer, James C. Furness, Jr., Michael L. Wilkey, Donald O. Johnson
Abstract/Introduction:
Sonication technology is being developed, under the sponsorship of the National Energy Technology Laboratory, for the remediation of well bore damage in underground natural gas storage wells. Two separate technologies, lowfrequency sonication and underwater plasma, were developed and tested during the last 2 years. Although the underwater plasma technology showed great potential at removing scale and rust, there are several areas that require further research and development before fieldtesting can proceed. However, low-frequency sonication was very efficient at removing scale and rust in laboratory testing. A prototypelaboratory unit was developed and was modified for additional laboratory tests and field tests in an observation well at Nicor Gas Pontiac Storage Field. The technology, project results, and accomplishments are discussed.
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Document ID: 42D83100

S Torage O Ptionality Using A Probabilistic Methodology
Author(s): David Erwin
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: 65B3A76D

New York State - Random Sample Meter Test Program
Author(s): Philip Digiglio
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: 11770C3F

Development, Testing, And Commercialization Of A Non-Invasive Stray Current Mapper
Author(s): Daphne C. Dzurko, Anton Kacicnik
Abstract/Introduction:
Responding to needs expressed by corrosion personnel, a consortium of natural gas transmission and distribution companies have developed a new tool called the Stray Current Mapper (SCM). This development started in 1997 and the product is now ready for marketplace introduction. During the development process, the members of the New York Gas Group (NYGAS) as well as several other gas companies and consortia were involved in several design iterations, field tests, and feedback sessions. This paper describes the tool, how it operates, and differences between dynamic and stray currents and the impact that they have on pipelines. It will also provide case studies where the SCM was used to identify the problem, aid in the selected solution, and then verify that the problem was solved.
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Document ID: 55703239

Integrated Metering
Author(s): Paul H. Seger
Abstract/Introduction:
10% of the utility meters in the US are read automatically, leaving 237,000,000 meters read manually. There are many communications methods in operation shoe leather, auto tire POTS, PLC, Cable, IrDA, and many RF methods licensed, unlicensed, and public carrier. Ill look at water and electric AMR deployments then SCADA applications to see what can be gleaned from these examples.
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Document ID: 59326CB0

Turbine Meter Test Results - Close Coupling
Author(s): Edgar B. Bowles, Jr., Darin L. George, Marybeth Nored
Abstract/Introduction:
In support of the planned revision of American Gas Association (AGA) Report No. 7, commercial turbine flow meters were recently tested in the Low Pressure Loop (LPL) at the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) Metering Research Facility (MRF). This paper presents the results of tests of four commerciallyavailable turbine meters tested in three installation configurations referenced in the current AGA-7 - the recommended meter run configuration, the close-coupled configuration, and the short-coupled configuration. The test meters included high-capacity meters and singlerotor and dual-rotor designs. Results were compared to determine the relative measurement biases of the test meters in these three different piping arrangements. Meters were also tested with a straight length of pipe installed upstream and with the ISO 9951 high-level perturbation piping immediately upstream of the meter runs, to evaluate meter performance in the presence of asymmetric, high swirl flows. The data are presented from the perspective of proposed revisions to the AGA-7 guidelines.
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Document ID: 082B7DCA

Intelligent Multi-Path Ultrasonic Flowmeters
Author(s): James E. Gallagher, Michael P. Saunders
Abstract/Introduction:
Companies today are grappling with the implementation of Multi-Path Ultrasonic Flowmeters (MUSMs) in an efficient and effective manner. While the MUSM technology provides the user with a high level of performance if installed correctly, it also provides the user with a wealth of information about its operation. When interpreted and analyzed thoroughly, the operating data provides the user with a number of ways to determine the effectiveness of the measurement, creating a benchmark for performance. This paper contains the results of experiments of MUSMs in natural gas service employing - Intelligent integration techniques Techniques to monitor MUSMs in the real world environment for troubleshooting and assurance of performance (diagnostics) The combination of these elements provides an intelligent multi-path ultrasonic flowmeter with advanced integration and diagnostic capabilities. This paper presents experimentally validated concepts, proposed by the authors, that combine superior performance under real world piping configurations with a simplified meter design that enables the user community to benefit from significantly reduced capital and operating costs. The intellectual property discussed reflects domestic and foreign patents pending of Savant Measurement Corporation for intelligent integration and diagnostics for MUSMs.
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Document ID: EA0E7B8B

Pulsation Effects On Orifice Meters
Author(s): Donald R. Smith, Kile S. Watson, Stephen Price, Jerry Paul Smith
Abstract/Introduction:
The effects of unsteady differential pressure on orifice meter accuracy have been discussed in many technical articles. However, there is still some confusion in the industry concerning the different causes of this phenomenon. More importantly, the different techniques which are used to minimize the resulting flow measurement errors are not universally understood. Acoustic resonances that are associated with the internals of the orifice meter and gage lines can affect measured differential pressures. Such internal resonances are present in all orifice meters where the differential pressure transducers are installed on orifice taps some distance away from the orifice plate. Errors can also result from improper averaging of differential pressures. These problems are usually categorized as square root errors. Digital flow meters can minimize the classical square root error problems by calculating flows based on instantaneous differential pressure, instead of the average pressure. However, if the differential pressures are modulated by false pulsation due to gage line resonances, the computed flow rates will be incorrect when square root corrections are applied. In the following text, these phenomena are discussed in detail. Techniques for reducing errors attributable to square root errors and/or the effects of gage line pulsation are presented. Case histories illustrating pulsation effects on orifice meters are also included.
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Document ID: 3876410D

Recipe For Success: The Evolution Of PSE&Gs Service Apprentice Training Program
Author(s): Paul E. PIRRO,MICHAEL C. Mannix
Abstract/Introduction:
Over the years, the Service Apprentice Training Program at Public Service Electric & Gas Company (PSE&G) has been effective in developing the skills necessary to produce competent service technicians. While the content of the training program has continued to meet the needs of the business, the Technical Training staff and Appliance Service business leaders recognized that there were opportunities to upgrade training resources, include technology improvements, expand the bank of test questions, reinforce on-the-job training and improve the overall efficiency of the training process. The Company committed significant resources over the past two years to accomplish the major task of redesigning the entire Service Apprentice Training Program, while handling an unprecedented training workload at the same time.
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Document ID: 98C9161A

Renewed Interest In LNG Imports
Author(s): James P. Lewis, Pat Outtrim
Abstract/Introduction:
The renewed interest in LNG imports into the US strongly suggests the potential participants view the divergence in the demand and supply curves for natural gas in North America will create an attractive floor price for natural gas. This floor price will be higher than current prices. The floor price will be determined primarily by the increasing complexity and costs of new reserves. This will allow LNG imports to be attractive for the gas marketers and as a supplemental supply downstream to pipelines, LDCs and the consumers. Imports contracted on a long-term basis would provide both stability to domestic prices and an incentive for investments in facilities that use gas such as power plants.
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Document ID: 7F863758

Using Vacuum Excavation Equipment In The Presence Of Natural Gas
Author(s): James E. Huebler, George Ragula
Abstract/Introduction:
Vacuum excavation has been used by the gas distribution industry for several decades. Recently there has been a large increase in vacuum excavation, including at locations with leaking gas. Some of the more popular hoses, purchased at home building supply stores, are favored because they are inexpensive and lightweight. However, they are also good at creating static electricity. Several utilities have raised questions about the safety of these systems. Can air/gas mixtures occur in the flammability range in the hose and vacuum components? Can the static electricity in the hose or a flying rock hitting the back wall of the soil collection tank ignite the flammable mixture? Will a fire or explosion occur? Has the industry been lucky? Or is the system safe? This paper reports the latest results in an ongoing study at Gas Technology Institute (GTI) to answer these questions.
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Document ID: 21158715

Environmental Considerations For Underground Gas Storage Operations
Author(s): David J. Germann, Tedd A. Ronning
Abstract/Introduction:
Underground storage operations are subject to numerous environmental regulations and permit conditions. Those environmental considerations may fall under the jurisdiction of federal, state, and local authorities. Non-compliance with environmental regulations can result in disruption of operations, damage to reputation and relationships with regulators, monetary fines, or environmental damage. In most instances air emissions and produced water management are the most predominant environmental issues faced by underground gas storage operators. Management of hazardous materials and wastes are a daily consideration, as are the management of underground and aboveground storage tanks. Long-term environmental considerations include abandoned well management, historical contamination, and remediation projects. Habitat and species protection issues can affect current operations as well as facility expansion and development projects.
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Document ID: E8CF6E65

Development Of A Live Internal Cast Iron Bell Joint Sealing System - Innerseal
Author(s): Anthony Winiewicz, Dennis Jarnecke
Abstract/Introduction:
A method for live, insitu sealing of large diameter, 16-24, cast iron bell joints has been developed by innerseal. The process involves live entry into a low pressure distribution system, location of the joints, preparation, and sealing. Remote controlled robots with closed caption television cameras perform the work required to prepare the pipe and apply the seal. Such a system represents significant advantages over traditional external sealing methods in that the major cost, the cost of the excavation, can be minimized by access to multiple joints from a single excavation. Additionally, leaks in difficult locations such as railroad crossings, busy intersections, highway crossings, etc. can potentially be accessed from outside the problem zone minimizing cost and public impact.
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Document ID: 3E162C38

Draft 2002 National Fuel Gas Code: Partial List Of Changes From 1999 Edition As Of 3/12/02
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: CBD94460

Best Practices Practices Benchmarking Benchmarking Orientation
Author(s): Charles P. Ivey
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: DDB102CC

Fluidic Oscillation Measurement
Author(s): Chuck Brunson
Abstract/Introduction:
Fluidic Oscillation as a measurement technology for many years. Recent advances in this technology now make this a highly robust, costeffective solution to metering needs. This paper will discuss the advances and benefits. Based on Bernoullis Theory - A slow moving high pressure gas becomes fast moving low pressure gas at the nozzle exit forming a jet of gas. The jet, once formed can be controlled by the Coanda effect using an obstacle in the flow that is designed to optimize the performance of the meter. Controlling the jet path enables formation of feedback nodes of pressure on either side of the jet. This provides a predictable oscillation of the jet. The metrology of the meter is only related to the mechanical design of the oscillation chamber and flow tranquilizer. The jet oscillations are detected using a thermo-resistive sensing device, which provides the data to the electronic index. In addition to the commonly known benefits of static metering technology (no moving parts and the possibility of integrated volume conversion and AMR), fluidic oscillation provides high rangeability in a robust design that tolerates unclean gas.
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Document ID: 243C7A24

Correlation Procedures
Author(s): Winston C. Meyer, Jeff Rogers, Paul Chip Lang
Abstract/Introduction:
Maintaining accuracy confidence of the proving equipment is improved through the use of correlation procedures and documentation adopted by our meter shops. The primary objective of the prover correlation project is to establish a means of comparing meter proving equipment results internally within Reliant Energy and externally with third parties to provide NIST traceability for Reliant Energys gas bell and sonic nozzle provers.
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Document ID: 8FB30D6F

Apprentice Service Training At Nipsco
Author(s): Scott J. Daley
Abstract/Introduction:
For any company to provide a high level of customer service, it becomes increasingly necessary to provide its employees with a comprehensive training program that meets all their needs. At Northern Indiana Public Service Company (NIPSCO), apprentice service training not only teaches the knowledge and skills necessary for the gas business, but since NIPSCO is a combined utility, we also teaches the basic principles to deal with electric meter installations. Additionally, with NIPSCOs Extra Service Protection (ESP) service contract business for space heating and hot water appliances, a large portion of service training is directed towards appliance repair. Maintaining these skills through a continuing education program is mandatory to keep up with todays technologies and customer demands.
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Document ID: 5F4207BD

Elba Island Recommissioning Project Southern LNG
Author(s): John Mccutchen, Edward Jones, Edward Vogel
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: 0B2A7D83

Ultrasonic Gas Meters From Flow Lab To Field: A Case Study
Author(s): James N. Witte
Abstract/Introduction:
Sixteen multi-path ultrasonic meters were followed in this case study from flow calibration to in service operation. Final calibration factors ranged between 1.0025 and 1.0078. Changes in meter performance were determined by transfer proof against a master meter. Meter performance changes of 0.5% to 1.5% were seen. Improvements in meter diagnostics analysis are indicated.
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Document ID: 7BFE80AC

Security For Your Business, Physical Assets And People
Author(s): Pat Outtrim
Abstract/Introduction:
The terrorist threat is real even if the probability for attack on a single plant is low. Unfortunately LNG facilities are a high profile target, thanks to significant press coverage of concerns in Boston. Due to the siting requirements in US codes, land based facilities that meet these exclusion zones have a negligible public risk. Risk mitigation measures focus on Probability times Consequences. Mitigation of both is important. However, the facility itself is at risk. As the consequences are addressed in the codes and designs, reduction of the probability needs to be addressed separately. When actively implemented, threat analysis and countermeasure plans are very constructive. Ships are generally low risk from external attack but could have serious consequences. NOTE: this paper does not address specific vulnerabilities of LNG facilities or how to address those. This should be done in a confidential security/risk audit.
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Document ID: 2883C493

Natural Gas Pressure Boosting For Small Distributed Power Applications
Author(s): John P. Elson, Troy W. Renken, Brian R. Butler, Ross E. Dueber
Abstract/Introduction:
A fuel gas booster system has been developed as a unique gas compression product for use in supplying reliable high-pressure natural gas to distributed power generation equipment such as microturbines, dual fuel gensets and fuel cells. This gas boost product meets a unique need by boosting pipeline available gas to the 60-100 psig pressure range required by this new power generation equipment. Depending on specific design and inlet gas parameters, this product can fuel power generation equipment from 30 to 300 kW in size.
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Document ID: C4714080

Joint Trench Construction Streamlines Underground Residential Development Projects
Author(s): Phil Voltz, David Helwig
Abstract/Introduction:
A growing number of gas, electric, telecommunications and cable television utilities are utilizing the joint trench construction process for their underground residential development (URD) projects. This technology enables utilities to save 15-30% over traditional trenching practices and reduces the risk of delay and trench loss due to poor weather conditions. The joint trench construction process has proven to increase ease of business through improved coordination and scheduling resulting in enhanced customer satisfaction and cost reduction. The joint trench process, underground residential development project, accomplishments and applications are discussed.
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Document ID: 8EC51C44

U.S. Department Of Energys Advanced Storage Concepts Program
Author(s): Gary P. Sames, James R. Ammer
Abstract/Introduction:
Major studies by the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) are exploring alternatives to service the need for new storage development and expansion in areas without conventional storage options. The need for new technology is most pressing in many important regions of the U.S. without typical storage geology (i.e., the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, South Atlantic, South, and Pacific Northwest), and in areas where existing conventional storage does not meet the requirements of end users. Eleven project overviews are presented in this paper, both completed and ongoing, that have received DOE funding to investigate alternative storage technologies. This program is designed to enhance the future reliability of the natural gas infrastructure, especially in close proximity to growing residential natural gas use and existing and planned industrial and power generation facilities.
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Document ID: 841AC940

Current State Of Fuel Cell Technology And The Impact On Customer Service And Gas Distribution
Author(s): Jim Baxter, Ron Quick, Matt Romanow
Abstract/Introduction:
The distributed generation market is being created by several factors, including deregulation in energy businesses, which in turn is being driven, in part, by demands by the market for greater choice in energy matters. Distributed Generation (DG) technologies provides an opportunity for the gas utilities to respond to these demands by giving their customers what they want.
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Document ID: 03EA3952

Designpros - Development Of A Distribution Designer Training Program
Author(s): Lawrence A. Bick, Dan Plourde
Abstract/Introduction:
Distribution designers are key employees for any gas and/or electric distribution companys delivery business. At most companies, however, training for distribution designers is handled informally through mentoring and on-the-job training. While degreed engineers have formal engineering education and continuing education opportunities, and field employees have structured apprentice training programs, distribution designers rarely have a structured, comprehensive training program available to them. There are also very few technical degrees available for the purposes of becoming a utility distribution designer. Distribution designers frequently come up through the ranks of a utility from administrative, mapping or field positions, and while they may have general knowledge of the delivery business, they rarely have detailed knowledge of distribution design. This paper describes how Xcel Energy identified a need for a designer training program, developed the program, and addresses training program content and administrative issues
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Document ID: B9A5E2E6

Guide For Gas Trangsmissipon Andt Distcribution Piping Systems
Author(s): Paul P. Gustilo
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: 4B3AC676

Natural Gas Sampling Techniques - Recent Research Results
Author(s): Darin George, Marybeth Nored
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: DF032BF9

The Development And Testing Of A Low Cost Inferential Natural Gas Energy Flow Rate Prototype Retrofit Module
Author(s): Eric Kelner
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: 5308F18E

8Gas Industry R&D Update
Author(s): Steven Gauthier
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: E55A6585

Overview Of Nygas R & D Program Nysearch()
Author(s): Daphne Dzurko
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: A8C44565

The Dot Plastic Pipe Data Collection Program Status
Author(s): Anita Romero
Abstract/Introduction:
A voluntary data collection program that supports an analysis of the frequency and causes of in-service plastic piping material failures.
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Document ID: 81A7B38A

Underground Utility Cuts And Pavement Restoration Issues: Information For The Gas Industry
Author(s): Mike Pometto
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: BA65D2E1

Pipeline Integrity Pipeline Integrity Through Data Integrationthrough Data Integration
Author(s): William F. Marshall
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: D936A6EF

Pipeline Integrity Management Update
Author(s): Paul Gustilo
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: 4C9F3861

Pipeline Integrity Management In High Consequence Areas
Author(s): William H. Gute
Abstract/Introduction:
Accelerate Assessments of Pipelines in High Consequence Areas (HCAs) Improve Company Integrity Management Systems Expand Government Role in Reviewing Integrity Plans and Programs Increase Public Assurance in Pipeline Safety
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Document ID: 3EE73F4B

Pipeline Integrity Management Panel Discussion AGA Spring Meeting Chicago May 13, 2002
Author(s): David Berger
Abstract/Introduction:
The objective of KeySpan Energys Transmission Pipeline Integrity Management Program is to provide a safe and reliable mode of transporting natural gas energy to our customers in compliance with existing and future regulatory requirements. KeySpan will use existing tools & emerging technology to accomplish this mission. The technology and tools utilized will include a mixture of both prescriptive and performance parameters. This will include internal inspection, pressure testing and direct assessment of the pipeline. The sequence of internal inspections, pressure testing, direct assessment and subsequent repairs will be determined using a risk based model with personal safety as the first requirement.
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Document ID: 0A82BB06

Planning For The Integrity Rule From A Ldc Perspective
Author(s): Lee Reynolds
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: 33968230

Niagara Mohawk And Nygas Pipeline Integrity Efforts Presentation To The 2002 AGA Operations Conference May 13 - 14, 2002
Author(s): Thomas J. Picciott
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: 0EEAA328

Take Home Vehiiclle Program AGA Presentation Monday(, May 13, 2002)
Author(s): Richard S. Di Loreto, Con Edison
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: D69BCE49

Advancements In Horizontal Directional Drilling Weak Links For No Dig Technologies: The Tow Tension Monitoring Tool
Author(s): Maximillian J. Kieba, Christopher J. Ziolkowski
Abstract/Introduction:
A problem facing Horizontal Direction Drilling (HDD) installations of PE pipe is that the pipe sometimes breaks or is overstressed because the pulling forces of the drill rig often exceed the forces acting on the pipe end. To help protect the pipe, a weak-link between the drill stem and pipe is installed that breaks when safe load limits are exceeded. However, when the weak-link breaks the crew still has to retrieve the pipe, either by re-attaching the pipe at the break point or starting the job from the beginning. Even if the pipe doesnt break, the utility has no definite way of knowing if the pipe significantly approached the maximum safe tensile values or for how long.
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Document ID: F6C40BC0

Installation Of Uncased Polyethylene Gas Pipes Under Railroad Crossings Using Hdd Techniques
Author(s): Michael m. Mamoun, Angelo Fabiano, Harry E. Stewart,
Abstract/Introduction:
[Abstract Not Available]
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Document ID: 912DFD39

Operator Qualification A Contractors Perspective
Author(s): Joe Barnett
Abstract/Introduction:
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Document ID: CBFCE427

Dirty Vs. Clean Ultrasonic Gas Flow Meter Performance
Author(s): John Lansing
Abstract/Introduction:
The use of ultrasonic meters (USMs) for natural gas custody applications during the past few years has increased at a remarkable rate. The growth rate increased after the publication of Measurement Canadas PS-G-E-06 Provisional Ultrasonic Specification Ref 1 and AGA Report No. 9, Measurement of Gas by Multipath Ultrasonic Meters Ref 2 in June of 1998. The many benefits of USMs have been well documented over the past few years Ref 3. With the increased population of USMs in the gas industry, many users are asking more questions about this technology.
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Document ID: 49C3BC61

Benefits Of Flow Calibrating Ultrasonic Meters
Author(s): John Lansing
Abstract/Introduction:
In the recent past users purchased ultrasonic meters (USMs) and often installed them without flow calibration. This may have been due in part because AGA Report No. 9 does not require flow calibration. Also, calibration facilities in North America a few years ago could not provide a full capacity test on 10-inch and larger meters. AGA 9 did, however, require the manufacturer to build meters that were within 0.7% for 12-inch and larger, and within 1.0% for 10- inch and smaller, prior to calibration. Of course, without flow calibration, there was always the chance a meter wouldnt meet this requirement.
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Document ID: C041770F

The AGA/GTI Security Initiative Protects Scada Communications
Author(s): William F. Rush, John A. Kinast
Abstract/Introduction:
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Document ID: 0CA4CA41

Anti-Terrorism Strategies Protect Utilities
Author(s): John A. Kinast, William F. Rush
Abstract/Introduction:
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Document ID: 6B81B34F

Keepiing Custtomerrs And Commiittmentts
Author(s): Jim Thompson
Abstract/Introduction:
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Document ID: D5F5B45D

World Trade Center Area Of Isolation
Abstract/Introduction:
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Document ID: 836F2531


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