Measurement Library

Western Gas Measurement Short Course Publications (1971)

Western Gas Measurement Short Courses

Fundamentals Of Measurement
Author(s): James m. Henn
Abstract/Introduction:
Our gas industry began in the early 1830s with the formation of the Baltimore, Atlanta, Manhattan apd phi1adelphia gas 1ight companies founded to sell gas for street lighting.. Gas cooking came into being shortly thereafte,, greatly adding to the load.
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Document ID: D521A220

Manufacturess Regulator Testing
Author(s): Haro1d F. Kruzan
Abstract/Introduction:
The compiling of regulator performance data has historically been a controversial subject. The equipment and methods used can have considerable effect on the result. It is not unusual to experience as much as 30 to 40% variance in data due to variations in piping. The program committee has posed several questions on the subject of regulator testing and has asked me to comment on them from the manufacturerss point of view
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Document ID: CFD2A53A

Customer Testing Of Small Regulators
Author(s): Carl K. Nielsen
Abstract/Introduction:
For the past several years Northwest Natural Gas Company has had some form of regulator test program. While the activity in this area has varied with the need for data and available time and financial resources, the program has steadily grown. Perhaps we should begin by exploring a few ideas about why we have continued and expanded our regulator testing program
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Document ID: 088C7420

American Workshop
Author(s): Ken Bordner Al Hilden
Abstract/Introduction:
The following new products were presented at the American Workshop. First was the new EC orifice (elevation compensation) which is used in the 1800 Series, the 2002 and the 2302 regulators. This orifice is a completely new patented design, which when applied will give a stable outlet with a varying inlet pressure
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Document ID: 1BBC1354

Fisher Workshop
Author(s): Dick Williams, Jerry Haynes
Abstract/Introduction:
The following new Fisher Controls Company products and solutions to regulator problems were presented: Type 199, which is a new industrial and commercial regulator for to 10,000 to 15,000 cfh. Its characteristics .re very similar to gg, and it is furnished in 3/4, 1 and 1-1/4 pipe size. loads up the Type the group. This conhas great flexibility. The 5300 series is a new service type regulator for intermediate loads, direct operate. It fills a gap between the 51OO series, small service regulators, and the 5200 series, large service regulators.
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Document ID: 19537BFE

Sprague Workshop
Author(s): R. B. Audo Anthony Tessitore Carl Nielson
Abstract/Introduction:
Mr. R. B. Audo made a presentation of the Sprague B 34 SO and B 531. The presentation included an explanation of operation from drawings and cutaway devices and some sample situations in which the units would benefit a customer during operation. Section III Mr. C. Nielson made a presentation of the Sprague CL 31 and CL 231 using results of tests obtained at his Station E test facility in Portland, Oregon. The presentation included display units of the equipment, slides of the test facility and curves showing the characteristics of the regulator at various inlet pressures and under various outlet conditions including shock load.
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Document ID: 6DDDFF9F

Rockwell Regulator Workshop
Author(s): R. P. Murlless, John Townsend
Abstract/Introduction:
Items discussed in this workshop were: Problems of legible, charted measurement as a product of: A. Inertia effects of rotary meters on control regulators B. Rapid sequence industrial boiler controls, and C. Slow response from regulators
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Document ID: 0E493D2F

Ops And Pressure Regulation
Author(s): Kenneth J. Seeds
Abstract/Introduction:
The gas industry in the United States has for long been almost a self-regulated industry as far as its own operations were concerned. The industry has used B31.8 as its creed for operation and has had a relatively safe and functional operation. The key word here is relative. The industry has had its problems on occasion and in these times of consumer protection and government regulation, incidents that have occurred have been magnified to show that there is almost no industry without some fault as far as safe operation. Through social and political pressures the Department of Transportation has created a new creed in its writing of the OPS regulations
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Document ID: 5D47D97A

Refinements In Sulfur Monitoring And Odorization Control
Author(s): A. L. Uhiteheadl
Abstract/Introduction:
Sulfur is an undesirable impurity in natural gas. sulfur, in its various forms, can cause corrosion contribute very undesirable odors, cause irritating effects to humans and vegetation alike when the products of combustion Of such gasis vented to the atmosphere. The very minute amounts of sulfur remaining in the gas even after processing for sales, can cause reduction of activity, or poisoning, of certain industrial catalysts. Sour gas must be processed to very rigid sulfur limitations before the gas can become an acceptable commodity.
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Document ID: 9494FECF

Profitable Measurement
Author(s): Paul A. Hoglund
Abstract/Introduction:
The term Profitab1e Measurement will actually be a paper on the Measurement Committee of the American Gas Association. Im using a put-on word. It is meant to raise questions in your mind, to rouse your curiosity and hopefully produce some new and constructive ideas. Undoubtedly as broad an adjective as profitable can mean many things to many people. I hope in the course of todays discussron to narrow it down to what I mean by profitable measurement
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Document ID: 24DF6BD5

Solid State Digital Telemetering System For Gas Displacement And TUBINE Meters
Author(s): Elton C. Phillips
Abstract/Introduction:
The desire to transmit vOlumetric information from a gas meter to a central location and also the desire to have instantaneous flow rate data from the turbine type meters has led to the development of a basic pulse generator system and other devices to accomplish this end. The equipment to be discussed is applicable to the Turbine and the Rotary Meters. Diaphragm meters cannot be handled at this time in this manner (see Figure land Figure II). The mechanica1 output of the Turbine and Rotary Meters are relatively high speed and through reduction gears are reduced to a volumetric indication in a totalizing counter. The mechanical output of the meter is converted to an electrical output by a pulse generator. The electrical output is directed to one of several available instruments to indicate flow rate and totalization. The flow rate can be at line conditions or can be computed to a base volume. The information can be read locally or te1emetered at any distance required. The essential components of the system are the flow transducer (meter) with a pulse generator
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Document ID: 076882A5

Exhaust Emissions From A 1970 Vehicle Operated On Liquified Natural Gas
Author(s): Donald F. Devine John G. Mingle, Jr.
Abstract/Introduction:
Natural gas has been used for many years as a fuel for reciprocating engine use. The applications were in a stationary location and piped into the gas supply system. The problems of using natural gas on motor vehicle applications depends on the form of the fuel used, liquid natural gas or compressed natural gas. The next consideration is whether the vehicle is to be fully converted with modified engine construction or partially converted to the dual fuel concept using both natural gas and gasoline
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Document ID: CDE2A9D8

Some New Thoughts On Meter Testing
Author(s): Henry C. Judd
Abstract/Introduction:
Since our last meeting in Spokane, weve been experimenting with some new ideas in meter testing which I intend to report on to you this morning. Some of the ideas well discuss are admittedly controversia,, and I would hope that, during the question and answer period following this report or at some later date, I could hear the thoughts of any of you who are in disagreement. Each idea could be the subject of one hour report or longer by itself, so Ill have to be quite brief in discussing each one.
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Document ID: 09328C13

Pipe Line Measurement Work Shop
Author(s): J. C. Brient
Abstract/Introduction:
Im sure all of us will agree that the need for developing new ideas in measurement is a very important part of the Natural Gas industry.: We know that in the near future we will see Natural Gas become even more o a premium fuel than it is today, with a demand that will become increasingly difficult to supply. Therefore it is mperative that all gas be measured accurately. New aids and ideas that come to the gas industry each year are very much appreciated because each one shows that some company is interested in bettering our present standards of measuremen..
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Document ID: EBD34DDC

Transfer Prover Workshop
Author(s): Joe Hoffman Ken Bordner Bob Frederick
Abstract/Introduction:
This Workshop was primarily a joint effort by the manufacturers of transfer and a provers discussion by the users. It was centered around the discus sion of the fundamental operation and the field experience by gas utilities. A representative from the manufacturigg companies displayed their equipment. The sequence of operation was explained and the features of each unit. The Northwest Natural Gas Company also exhibited a large 20,000 cubic foot per hour transfer prover installed in a truck, which they are using to prove the large turbine meters. This truck was on display and available for inspection.
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Document ID: 1138A6D0

Sprague Meter Co. Gas Measurement Workshop
Author(s): R. B. Audo, Jack Clark, Anthony Tessuore
Abstract/Introduction:
Mr. R. Audo displayed and explained the function of the new combination regulator - meter (175 RM). Slides of typical installations were shown depicting bracketing and fittings used. Mr. J. Clark held a discussion concerning the various forms of measurement at elevated pressures with prime interest being given to fixed factor billing and measurement with pressure compensated indexes as opposed to the use of instrumentation. Pressure compensated indexes and fixed factor indexes as well as standard and temperature compensated meters were demonstrated on working meters. Slides of typical installations were shown and slides of some charts taken from the pressure recording devices used to check the accuracy of the tests were shown.
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Document ID: 01584EF6

Rochwell Workshop
Author(s): Zane Wade Don Kuest
Abstract/Introduction:
The Turbo. Meter utilizes a vane type turbine rotor to sense the velocity of the gas stream through a fixed flow area. This rotor is suspended by bearings with the direction of rotation perpendicular to the gas flow. The blades on the outer diameter of the rotor are set at about a 450 angle to the direction of flow. As the flowing gas strikes these blades, there will be an energy transfer from the kinetic energy of the gas to the rotating energy in the rotor. The available kinetic energy in the gas is a function of the mass of flowing gas and velocity of the gas. In an ideal turbine the angular velocity of the rotor would be directly proportional to the gas velocity. However, in an actual turbine, as in any physical system, there will be certain losses from retarding torque that will affect the proportionaltty of the velocities. Basically these losses fall into two categories, those due to mechanical conditions and those due to fluid conditions. Since the rotor speed is proportional to the gas velocity and hence gas flow rate, it becomes a simple matter to interpose the necessary reduction gears to come out with a calibrated index
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Document ID: 7049DAA1

American Meter Workshop
Author(s): Gerald Christensen Charles Wolverton
Abstract/Introduction:
The purpose of this workshop presentation was to review the theory and design features of the American CVM meter, Turbine meter, and continuous integrating base pressure and base volume indexes and to discuss field experience with these new devices. The CVM meter is a rotating vane displacement meter. Four freely rotating vanes displace gas in an annular measuring chamber formed by two concentric cylinders. A gate driven by the rotating vanes by means of non-critica1 timing gears rotates in the same direction and permits the vanes to pass from the outlet to the inlet of the meter without allowing gas to pass unmeasured from inlet to outlet. By means of a magnetic stuffing box and appropriate gearing the vane rotations are transmitted to the meter index.
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Document ID: D69F22A8

Notes On Properly Sizing Domestic Regulators
Author(s): Howard W. Berghegger
Abstract/Introduction:
Measurement accuracy is today of greater concern than ever before. But even if a meter is 100 percent accurate, over-all measurement accuracy will be inaccurate if the upstream regulator is misapplied or incorrectly sized. In other words requlators must be selected to match requirements just as carefully as meters.
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Document ID: 079A3F08


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