Measurement Library

Western Gas Measurement Short Course Publications (1965)

Western Gas Measurement Short Courses

Orifice Mitering Equipment
Author(s): Mr. Un C. Bennett
Abstract/Introduction:
Today, as never before, there is a great demand for natural gas, the worlds most perfect fuel. This demand has resulted in a tremendous increase in the facilieses to prxxluce, transport and distribute natural gas. A v i t a l part of these f a c i l i t i e s are thoseused for measuring gas. Considerable sums of money are paid for the purchase or sale of gas, and the revenues collected depends on the accumcy with which t h i s valuable cotimdity is measured.
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Document ID: 145A82D9

Reading And Calcuiating Orifice Meter Charts
Author(s): P. A. Lathrap
Abstract/Introduction:
So far we have covered the theory of o r i f i c e nter measurement, and have discussed the nuts and bolts portion of an orifice ineter i n s t a l l a t i o n . As we have seen, the o r i f i c e ireter i s b a s i c a l l y a very sinole device. A restriction (the o r i f i c e plate) placed in a pioe carryinig the fluid to be ineasured (the meter t u b e ) , creates a pressure droo or d i f f e r e n t i a l . T?ds d i f f e r e i i t i a l , along with the pressure of the fluid, is transmitted through small diameter lines to a meter gauge whiCh records them in the fonn of i S e s on a Chart. T?iis meter Chart is the end product of the efforss of the design engineer, the o r i f i ce meter equipnient manufacturer and the meter personnel in the field and is the o f f i c i S record on whiCh the b i l l i n g is based.
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Document ID: C64E784B

D S S I G N 0 F O R I F I E E m T T E R S T T T I N Ns
Author(s): J. S. Richards
Abstract/Introduction:
The proper design of an orifice meter station and its various componenss is an exact science, The history of our industry shows-that the development oftheproper design of metering equipment is in constant change. We well know that profits are either made or lost at the final point of delivery to our customer and it is the responsibility of the design engineer to insure his company that
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Document ID: 77BA35D2

Gas Pressere Regulat Ion
Author(s): William S Fielder
Abstract/Introduction:
This paper will discuss the equipment used by our industry to control pressures and volumes, producing good measurement of gas delivered, with particular emphasis upon installations that are designed to operate at Itlh pressure i.e. city gate stations, primary regulating stations, mefer stations that deriver gas to customers directly from high pressure supply lines
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Document ID: B1A63F16

Regulation With Measurement In Mind
Author(s): William T. Malloy
Abstract/Introduction:
As a Distribution Company, we have a responsibility to the customer. the Public service Commission, and to oUr stockholders that the quantity of gas delivered to a consmer be measured accurately. One of the primary factors effecting acciurate energymeasurement is metering-pressure. Volume as stated in Boyles Law is a function of pressure varying in inverse proportion to the absolute pressure. Hence, an error in metering pressure results in an error in metered volume which carries through to effect company profits. In this paper we will not be concerned with the effectsIX elevation, supercompressibiUty. etc., since these are allowed for by factors used by the measurement people
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Document ID: 40B50173

Regulation By Standard Valves
Author(s): James C. Brient
Abstract/Introduction:
Pressure controlling by means of such stand valves as Plug, Gate, Piston, Ball, or Butterfly is not by any means a new idea. However, with the larger volumes and higher transmission pressures of todays pipelines, this type of regulator is finding a much more acceptable place in our industry. Careful and conclusive research has resulted in the production of reliable, accurately processed materials which have proven their worth in this type of regulator.
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Document ID: 409B5E44

Meter Shop Hiactices
Author(s): Vernon Damm
Abstract/Introduction:
Much has been said and written on the subject of meter shop practice and though the basic operations in meter t e s t i n g and repairing w-e well known to thosTirtio have the responsihlllty for t h i r v o r k , discussing and observing how others do t h i s job is always timely and profitable. The two specifcc things that are f i r t t thought of when meter repair shop is mentioned are the t e s t i n g and repairing of meters. Of course ma other associated operations are necessary to accomplish t h i s
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Document ID: F71457C0

Integrating Devices For Positive Displacement Meters
Author(s): Fred E. Meininger
Abstract/Introduction:
Integrating devices have been developed by the Rockwell Mfg. Company and American Meter Company in response to a demand from users of large meters for a meter capable of giving a direct reaxiing of the volume at base pressure d if required base temperature, without any calculations required. America Meter integrating devices were covered at the school in 1963
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Document ID: A7EF37D8

Field Testing With Low Pressure Flow Provers
Author(s): Oscar A. Kash
Abstract/Introduction:
The testing and maintenace of meters constitutes a very important part in alI gas companies as a large amount of their revenue is based upon the accuracy of measurement. For the most part, this is the reason for testing, to maintain the accuracy and the working condition of the meters. To get this accuracy an efficient meter testing and maintenace program must be established and maintained. Such a prograrn could become quite expensive and each company should determine what program is best for them in this particular phase of operations.
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Document ID: B8D73E15

Critical Flow Orifice Prover
Author(s): William R. Hobbs
Abstract/Introduction:
Before considering the critical flow prover for testing positive meters in the field, there are several things that should be taken into consideration. The loation of the mter nuist be such that the Aassing of large volume of gas is not hazardous. The station should, Tf economically possible, be designed so that the meter can be completely biassed from the rest of the meter station, leaving the regulators to control the pressure. The selection of reliable free-operating, positive-cloiing valves on both the inlet and outlet of the meter is also very important.
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Document ID: E306518F

Rotary Meters & New Developments In Displacement Metering
Author(s): Edward E. Hanson
Abstract/Introduction:
A Rotary Meter consists basically of two oppositely rotating iipellers of two lobe or figure 8 contour, operating within a rigid casing having inlet and outlet connections on opposite sides. Impellers are designed to form a continuous line seal without contact between the linpellers at all positions during rotations.
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Document ID: 9D2089AF

Determinnng The Natural Gasoline Content Of Natural Gas
Author(s): D. R. Sullivan
Abstract/Introduction:
The title of this paper is Determining the Natural Gasoline Content of Natural Gas. However, while three methods will be mentioned briefly, it will deal primarily with the Standard Charcoal Test as described in the American Gas Association (A.G.A.) and the Natural Gasoline Association of America (N.G.A.A.) Code 101-13.
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Document ID: 7A98A7C3

Fundamentals Of Remote Measurement & Control
Author(s): T5m E-Baxter - Roy A. Charves
Abstract/Introduction:
The natural gas industry has been growing very rapidly in recent y e a r . . Our transmission and distribution systems have been adding a great deal of equipment, almost all of i t r e q u i r i n g measurement or control or both. Just a few years ago. we in the industry were facing this kind of a problem: Our station operators had to make regular rounds of their station,, reading gauges, checking engine functions and noting the position of valves. It was getting so that by the time an operator retunned to his desk from one datagathering trip, and before he could analyze the data he had collected, it was time for another trip.
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Document ID: 96F6DFA3

Calorimeters
Author(s): Ralph Trenton Day
Abstract/Introduction:
Thispaper will be confined to the operation and maintenance of an instrument called a Calorimeter which determines the heating value of gaseous fuels in units called British Thermal Units, and hereafter referred to as B.T.U.s. One B.T.U. being the quantity of heat that must be added to one avoirdupois pound of pure water to raise its temperature one degree fahrenheit, under standard pressure (30 Hg, (? 32F) and standard temperature eOF. A standard cubic foot of gas being a quantity of gas that at a base temperature and pressure will fill a space of one cubic foot when in equilibrium with water.
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Document ID: 778E9DDE

Orifice Mitering Rjndamentai
Author(s): H. C. Judd
Abstract/Introduction:
Anyone writing a paper on.ordfdce meter theory for presentatoon to a mixed group such as t h i f S confronted with a tough decision.- If-he assumed-that half of his class is reasonably infonned o n t h e subject, should he prepare a technical paper for t h e i r benefit and hope the other half of the class wont get h o p e l e S i lost? Or, should he assuSe his basic responsibility is to inforTthe uninfonted d hope he wont bore the others? My hODe is to please both gjoips, if that i s p o s s i b l e . For you beginners t h i s is essent i a l yy a p r i r T o v e r i n g basic fundamentals and for you oldtimers Ive tried to give some of these fundamentals a fresh approach which I hope you find interesting
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Document ID: 5E06FF0B


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